Eleven

By Lauren Myracle


One Word Summary: Charming.


This is an entirely wholesome and heartfelt book that perfectly captures the joy, awkwardness, delight and heartbreak  of fifth grade.

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Eleven.html

Countdown

By Deborah Wiles


One Word Summary: Sobering.


Until reading Countdown I never really considered the Cuban Missile Crisis or how petrifying an experience that must have been for the nation.

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Countdown.html

Hoot

By Carl Hiaasen


One Word Summary: Earnest.


Hoot is a solid, mostly unfaultable story. Lets call it a step in the

right direction.

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Hoot.html

Dick and Jan and Vampires

By Laura Marchesani


One Word Summary: Surprising.


Recommended for: Anyone old enough to have a sense of irony. Reading level: First grade. Content level: Teen and up.

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Dick_and_Jane_and_Vampires.html

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© Jordan B. Nielsen, 2012

The School Story

By Andrew Clements


One Word Summary: Precious.


The only thing that could make The School Story more charming would be if Andrew Clements turned out to be the pseudonym for an eleven-year-old girl.

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The_School_Story.html

The Game of Sunken Places

By M.T. Anderson


One Word Summary: Messy.


There are glimmers of a rich and incredibly complex world coming through in the story that occasionally draw you into the phantasmagoria, but the rest of it is basically incoherent.

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http://web.me.com/jordanbnielsen/PictureBook_Garden/TheGameofSunkenPlaces.html

Brains for Lunch

By K.A. Holt


One Word Summary: Experimental.


Zombies in Haiku?

And you’d thought you’d seen it all

Enter K.A. Holt


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BrainsForLunch.html

The Kneebone Boy

By Ellen Potter


One Word Summary: Unsettling.


Superbly written with smart charm, thoroughly rounded and lovable main characters, and a winning narrative device, ‘The Kneebone Boy’ stands as the best book I ever didn’t like.


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The_Kneebone_Boy.html

Justin Case

By Rachel Vail


One Word Summary: Neurotic.


If Woody Allen or David Sedaris were to have kept a diary when they were in third grade, it undoubtedly would have read like ‘Justin Case’, a sharp, quirky narrative that explodes with personality


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Justin_Case.html